TNH's Particles
* Ron Mueck: disturbing humanity.
* Haven't you always wanted a Norden Bombsight?
* Why you shouldn't use a malachite stalactite as a dildo.
* Tiny jumping robot.
* A line of Hamlet.
* Me and Other People's Characters: A Love Story.
* The strange tale of Social Autopsy.
* Interlude (Rise Up).
* A History of Rock in 15 Minutes.
* James Joyce, first-person shooter.
More...
PNH's Sidelights
* The Four Donald Trumps You Meet on Earth
* Facebook: Stop using it. Stop.
* Ursula Vernon: "This Vote Is Legally Binding"
* "A lot of white people are truly shocked by what these videos depict; I know very few African-Americans who are surprised."
* Our neighborhood is doomed
* The Negro Motorists' Green Book--and everything else in America. Read this astonishing article.
* Prescription Drug or Tolkien Elf?
* The College of Arms rules on heraldry for individuals in same-sex marriages
* Britons Demand to Live in Medieval Village Surrounded by a Wall
* How Should America Resist a Fascist?
More...
Abi's Parhelia
* Can we take a moment to just think about how incredibly scary magical healing is in-context?
* Hamilaria
* New York's Elevators Define the City
* Mapping the Sounds of Greek Byzantine Churches: How Researchers Are Creating "Museums of Lost Sound"
* No Wool, No Vikings
* How to Drop a Gulfstream IV into a Ravine: Habitual Noncompliance
* The Geek's Guide to Disability
* Fly like an eagle, die like a drone
* Upcycling
* Starships!
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Jim's Diffraction
* Angelus ad virginem 14th century Irish carol
* Christmas on the Theremin
* Kinect eye patch for Xbox One will protect what's left of your privacy
* Real-Time Wind Map
* IS-907: Active Shooter: What You Can Do
* Smithsonian museum artifacts can now be 3D printed at home
* PunditFact
* A Display You Can Reach Through And Touch
* The Craigslist killers: the full story
* Proposed Museum of Science Fiction
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Avram's Phosphenes
West Wing Cabinet Battle
Harrison!
Not throwin’ away my Spock
David Bowie — Lazarus
Dnipropetrovsk renames itself Dnipropetrovsk
You Know Nothing, Charlie Brown
“It’s actually the Puppies who are the Marxists.”
Wes Anderson’s The Shining
Thor gets a cellphone
Definitely-Not-Filthy Sailing Terminology
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Commonplaces
“We are prophets of a future not our own.” (Oscar Romero)

“Peace means something different from ‘not fighting’. Those aren’t peace advocates, they’re ‘stop fighting’ advocates. Peace is an active and complex thing and sometimes fighting is part of what it takes to get it.” (Jo Walton)

“You really think that safety can be plucked from the arms of an evil deed?” (Darla, “Inside Out”)

“Forgiveness requires giving up on the possibility of a better past.” (unknown)

“The whole point of society is to be less unforgiving than nature.” (Arthur D. Hlavaty)

“Terror consists mostly of useless cruelties perpetrated by frightened people in order to reassure themselves.” (Friedrich Engels)

“Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of believing that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.” (Ralph Waldo Emerson)

“You don't owe the internet your time. The internet does not know this, and will never learn.” (Quinn Norton)

“Great writing is the world's cheapest special effect.” (Teresa Nielsen Hayden)

“Everyone gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense.” (Gertrude Stein)

“Very few people are stupid. It’s just that the world really is that difficult and you can’t continually be careful.” (Quinn Norton)

“Armageddon is not around the corner. This is only what the people of violence want us to believe. The complexity and diversity of the world is the hope for the future.” (Michael Palin)

“Just because you’re on their side doesn’t mean they’re on your side.” (Teresa Nielsen Hayden)

“The fact that ‘there are only a handful of bad cops’ cuts no ice with me. If ‘only a handful of McDonald’s are spitting in your food,’ you’re not going to McDonald’s.” (Ta-Nehisi Coates)

“Young men and women, educated very carefully to be apolitical, to be technicians who thought they disliked politics, making them putty in the hands of their rulers, like always.” (Kim Stanley Robinson, Red Mars)

“The poor have been rebels, but they have never been anarchists; they have more interest than anyone else in there being some decent government. The poor man really has a stake in the country. The rich man hasn’t; he can go away to New Guinea in a yacht. The poor have sometimes objected to being governed badly; the rich have always objected to being governed at all. Aristocrats were always anarchists.” (G. K. Chesterton, The Man Who Was Thursday)

“When liberty is mentioned, we must observe whether it is not really the assertion of private interests.” (Hegel)

“History is the trade secret of science fiction.” (Ken MacLeod)

“But isn’t all of human history simultaneously a disaster novel and a celebrity gossip column?” (Anonymous LJ commenter)

“I see now that keen interest can illuminate anything, and that anything, moreover, has something worth illuminating in it, and that without that interest gates carved by Benvenuto Cellini from two diamonds would merely look chilly.” (Lord Dunsany)

“I grieve for the spirit of Work, killed by her evil child, Workflow.” (Paul Ford)

“The opposite of ‘serious’ isn't ‘funny.’ The opposite of both ‘serious’ and ‘funny’ is ‘squalid.’” (R. A. Lafferty)

“Ki is, of course, mystical bullshit. That’s why it works so well, both as a teaching idiom and a tool of practice in martial arts. It’s as nonexistent as charm, leadership, or acting. Humans are all about bullshit.” (Andrew Plotkin)

“We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, when all that we need to make us happy is something to be enthusiastic about.” (Charles Kingsley)

“Nobody panics when things go according to plan. Even when the plan is horrifying.” (The Joker)

“Hope has two daughters, anger and courage. They are both lovely.” (attributed to St. Augustine)

“Plot is a literary convention. Story is a force of nature.” (Teresa Nielsen Hayden)

“This movie has way too much plot getting in the way of the story.” (Joe Bob Briggs)

“If there is no willingness to use force to defend civil society, it’s civil society that goes away, not force.” (Teresa Nielsen Hayden)

“Always side with the truth. It’s much bigger than you are.” (Teresa Nielsen Hayden)

“Listen, here’s the thing about politics: It’s not an expression of your moral purity and your ethics and your probity and your fond dreams of some utopian future. Progressive people constantly fail to get this.” (Tony Kushner)

“I don’t want politicians who are ‘above politics,’ any more then I want a plumber who’s ‘above toilets.’” (Ta-Nehisi Coates)

“Plans are nothing; planning is everything.” (Dwight D. Eisenhower)

“People never lie so much as after a hunt, during a war, or before an election.” (Otto von Bismarck)

“Every organization appears to be headed by secret agents of its opponents.” (Robert Conquest)

“Not forgiving is like drinking rat poison and then waiting for the rat to die.” (Anne Lamott)

“Nothing makes one so vain as being told that one is a sinner.” (Oscar Wilde)

“Life isn’t divided into genres. It’s a horrifying, romantic, tragic, comical science-fiction cowboy detective novel.” (Alan Moore)

“See everything, overlook a great deal, improve a little.” (John XXIII)

“You will never love art well, until you love what she mirrors better.” (John Ruskin)

“Having a smallpox vaccine scar is like walking around with the moon landing and the Sistine Chapel on your upper arm.” (Angus Johnston)

“They lied to you. The Devil is not the Prince of Matter; the Devil is the arrogance of the spirit, faith without smile, truth that is never seized by doubt. The Devil is grim because he knows where he is going, and, in moving, he always returns whence he came.” (Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose)

“I can hire one half of the working class to kill the other half.” (Jay Gould)

“I’m a leftist. I don't argue with anyone unless they agree with me.” (Steven Brust)

“Adam was but human—this explains it all. He did not want the apple for the apple’s sake, he wanted it only because it was forbidden. The mistake was in not forbidding the serpent; then he would have eaten the serpent.” (Mark Twain)

“Details are all that matters; God dwells there, and you never get to see Him if you don’t struggle to get them right.” (Stephen Jay Gould)

“Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire.” (Gustav Mahler)

“But this kind of deference, this attentive listening to every remark of his, required the words he uttered to be worthy of the attention they excited—a wearing state of affairs for a man accustomed to ordinary human conversation, with its perpetual interruption, contradiction, and plain disregard. Here everything he said was right; and presently his spirits began to sink under the burden.” (Patrick O’Brian, Master and Commander)

“Hatred is a banquet until you recognize you are the main course.” (Herbert Benson)

“For a Westerner to trash Western culture is like criticizing our nitrogen/oxygen atmosphere on the grounds that it sometimes gets windy, and besides, Jupiter’s is much prettier. You may not realize its advantages until you’re trying to breathe liquid methane.” (Neal Stephenson)

“‘There are no atheists in foxholes’ isn’t an argument against atheism, it’s an argument against foxholes.” (James Morrow)

“And after the fire a still small voice.” (1 Kings 19:12)

“The man who tries to make the flag an object of a single party is a greater traitor to that flag than any man who fires at it.” (Lloyd George)

“The United States behaves like a salesman with a fantastic product who tries to force people to buy it at gunpoint.” (Emma of Late Night Thoughts)

“I’m a fuzzy-headed warm-hearted liberal, and I think fuzzy-headed warm-hearted liberalism is an ideological stance that needs defending—if necessary, with a hob-nailed boot-kick to the bollocks of budding totalitarianism.” (Charles Stross)

“The real test of any claim about freedom, I’ve decided, is how far you’re willing to go in letting people be wrong about it.” (Bruce Baugh)

“As with bad breath, ideology is always what the other person has.” (Terry Eagleton)

“Only he who in the face of all this can say ‘In spite of all!’ has the calling for politics.” (Max Weber)

“No, it’s not fair. You’re in the wrong universe for fair.” (John Scalzi)

“I don’t understand death, but I got hot dish down pretty good.” (Marissa Lingen)

“Skepticism is the worst form of gullibility.” (John “adamsj” Adams)

“We have a backstage view of ourselves and a third-row view of everybody else.” (Garrison Keillor)

“The Reign of Sin is more universal, the influence of unconscious error is less, than historians tell us.” (Lord Acton)

“All human progress, even in morals, has been the work of men who have doubted the current moral values, not of men who have whooped them up and tried to enforce them.” (H. L. Mencken)

“Tomorrow never happens. It’s all the same fucking day, man.” (Janis Joplin)

“Words are always getting conventionalized to some secondary meaning. It is one of the works of poetry to take the truants in custody and bring them back to their right senses.” (W. B. Yeats)

“It is a little embarrassing that, after 45 years of research and study, the best advice I can give to people is to be a little kinder to each other.” (Aldous Huxley)

“Never believe in a meritocracy in which no one is funny-looking.” (Teresa Nielsen Hayden)

“Probably no man has ever troubled to imagine how strange his life would appear to himself if it were unrelentingly assessed in terms of his maleness; if everything he wore, said, or did had to be justified by reference to female approval [...] If he gave an interview to a reporter, or performed any unusual exploit, he would find it recorded in such terms as these: ‘Professor Bract, although a distinguished botanist, is not in any way an unmanly man. He has, in fact, a wife and seven children. Tall and burly, the hands with which he handles his delicate specimens are as gnarled and powerful as those of a Canadian lumberjack, and when I swilled beer with him in his laboratory, he bawled his conclusions at me in a strong, gruff voice that implemented the promise of his swaggering moustache.’” (Dorothy L. Sayers)

“Grown ups are what’s left when skool is finished.” (Nigel Molesworth)

“If you don't like the ‘blame game,’ it’s usually because you’re to blame.” (Jon Stewart)

“Slang is for a war of signals.” (Unknown semiotician/palindromist)

“Science fiction is an argument with the world. When it becomes (solely) an argument within science fiction, it breathes recycled air.” (Ken MacLeod)

“All worthy work is open to interpretation the author didn’t intend. Art isn’t your pet—it’s your kid. It grows up and talks back.” (Joss Whedon)

“I really don’t know what you do about the ‘taxes is theft’ crowd, except possibly enter a gambling pool regarding just how long after their no-tax utopia comes true that their generally white, generally entitled, generally soft and pudgy asses are turned into thin strips of Objectivist Jerky by the sort of pitiless sociopath who is actually prepped and ready to live in the world that logically follows these people’s fondest desires.” (John Scalzi)

“So whenever a libertarian says that capitalism is at odds with the state, laugh at him. It’s like saying that the NFL is ‘at war’ with football fields. To be a libertarian is to say that God or the universe marked up that field, squirted out the pigskins from the bowels of the earth, and handed down the playbooks from Mt. Sinai.” (Connor Kilpatrick)

“True religion invites us to become better people. False religion tells us that this has already occurred.” (Abdal-Hakim Murad)

“There is a machine. Its program is ‘profit’. This is not a myth.” (Joss Whedon)

“There's always romance at the top of a system.” (Will Shetterly)

“Power always thinks it has a great soul and vast views, beyond the comprehension of the weak.” (John “Second US President” Adams)

“There is a document that records God’s endless, dispiriting struggle with organized religion, known as the Bible.” (Terry Eagleton)

“There comes a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part, you can’t even passively take part; and you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop, And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, the people who own it, that unless you’re free the machine will be prevented from working at all.” (Mario Savio)

“Racism is not merely a simplistic hatred. It is, more often, broad sympathy toward some and broader skepticism toward others.” (Ta-Nehisi Coates)

“To live is to war against the trolls.” (Henrik Ibsen)

“There is at the back of all our lives an abyss of light, more blinding and unfathomable than any abyss of darkness; and it is the abyss of actuality, of existence, of the fact that things truly are, and that we are ourselves incredibly and sometimes almost incredulously real.” (G. K. Chesterton)

“Perhaps all the dragons in our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us act, just once, with beauty and courage. Perhaps everything that frightens us is, in its deepest essence, something helpless that wants our love.” (Rainer Maria Rilke)

“It’s just a ride and we can change it any time we want. It’s only a choice. No effort, no work, no job, no savings and money, a choice right now, between fear and love. The eyes of fear want you to put bigger locks on your door, buy guns, close yourself off. The eyes of love instead see all of us as one.” (Bill Hicks)

“I don’t think we have a language, will ever have a language, that can describe transcendence in any useful way and I am aware that that transcendence may be nothing more than the illusory aspiration of a decaying piece of meat on a random rock. The thing is to be humble enough to be content with that while acting to other people as generously as if better things were true, and making art as if it might survive and do good in the world. Because what else are we going to do with the few short years of our life?” (Roz Kaveney)

“I hate living in a satirical dystopia.” (Arthur Hlavaty)

“No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.” (Samuel Beckett)

“Fuck every cause that ends in murder and children crying.” (Iain Banks)

“If it doesn’t connect with people around you who aren’t like you, it isn’t politics.” (Teresa Nielsen Hayden)

September 25, 2016
Open thread 214
Posted by Patrick at 07:24 PM * 105 comments

The air’s deciduous of letterhead.

September 23, 2016
SPOILERS in Orcus
Posted by Abi Sutherland at 02:08 PM * 33 comments

Summer, child,
Come on with me to Orcus
Leave your mother
And her worries behind.
Your dearest wish
Will lead to adventure
So come, little Summer,
It’s leaving time.

When you’re in Orcus
Birds going to speak like people
Women will shape-change
And frogs grow on trees.
But what’s that behind you?
It’s the Queen-in-Chains’ servant.
The Houndbreaker’s hunting;
Time to fly.

This is a thread to discuss, speculate about, and squee over Ursula Vernon’s new web serial Summer in Orcus, without worrying about spoiling it for people who aren’t caught up.

Note that the introductory lyrics are entirely drawn from the blurb and the first episode; I don’t know any more about what’s going to happen than anyone else. Except Ursula, I suspect.

(Also, it’s free on the web, but your attention is of course drawn to the Patreon and Paypal links on the front page.)

September 21, 2016
Dysfunctional Families: Think of the Children
Posted by Abi Sutherland at 06:00 AM * 95 comments

Normally when we use the phrase think of the children, it’s dismissive. And rightly so. The abstract possibility of children’s presence, a low-resolution notion of children’s safety, has been used as a club or a gag far too often. And the worst of it is, the people who say it are not thinking of the children, or they’d stop crying wolf and save that argument for when it really mattered. (When this is can be determined by listening to the children: a related skill, and indeed a basic prerequisite.)

I’ve read many stories about family breakdown in the news, heard them in conversation, seen them in my wider circle of friendship and acquaintance. These stories usually center on the adults whose relationships are in trouble, but I often find myself thinking of the children, wondering how they’re faring, wondering what hurt they’re suffering. Wishing someone could teach them how to navigate the situations they find themselves in far too young. So many of them will cope, but at a cost—one they’ll be paying interest on for years.

One thing that’s gone past my Twitter stream this last week is a British family court judgment written to be accessible to the people it affects: a mother who “often finds things hard to understand”, plus two children aged 10 and 12. Content warning for gaslighting. (But not, mercifully, for any neglect or physical or sexual abuse.)

I like this judge. He seems to be trying to give his intended audience the tools to deal with their situation, both explicitly and by example. So he says things like:

  • People can tell lies about some things and still tell the truth about other things.
  • I know that the children are loved and have been well looked after in many ways. Everyone says that the mother deserves praise for that, and praise also goes to Mr B and to Mr A when they deserve it.
  • There is a good side to Mr A - everyone has a good side - and this makes it hard for H and A and their mother to see what he is really like.
  • He has got inside her head and it will take time for her to recover.

He also talks about everyone in the story as people, with comprehensible motivations and reasons for their actions. The policewoman who was upset when Mr A put a video of her visit up on YouTube. Mr B, who has served time for violence and drugs offenses, but still tries to be a good father. The headteachers who have dealt with the family. The officials who exaggerated and skipped steps while reacting to the family’s trip to Turkey. Even Mr A, for good and ill.

And he talks about the children in the same way, with the same language. He writes with an awareness of what makes up their lives: school, home, parents and stepparents, grandparents, vacations; he treats these things as seriously as he does terrorism, religious extremism, crime, imprisonment. In doing this, he shows the children that they matter as much as adults do. That they have, as Jo Walton would say, equal significance.

This is what thinking of the children looks like. Thinking of them as people in need of concepts and tools for dealing with the situation they’re in and the people around them. Thinking about how to minimize the damage they’ll suffer from these chaotic circumstances. Thinking about how to support the good relationships in their lives and reduce the impact of this bad one.

Yes, please, let’s think of the children.


This is part of the sequence of Dysfunctional Families discussions. We have a few special rules, specific to the needs and nature of the conversations we have here.

  1. If you want to participate but don’t want your posts linked to your contributions to the rest of Making Light, feel free to choose a pseudonym. But please keep it consistent within these threads, because people do care. You can create a separate (view all by) history for your pseudonym by changing your email address. And if you blow it and cross identities, give me a shout and I’ll come along and tidy it up.
  2. On a related note, please respect the people’s choice to use a pseudonym, unless they make it clear that they are willing to let the identities bleed over in people’s minds.
  3. If you’re not from a dysfunctional background, be aware that your realities and base expectations are not the default in this conversation. In particular, please don’t do the “they’re the only family you have” thing. Black is white, up is down, and your addressee’s mother may very well be their nemesis.
  4. Be even more careful, charitable, and gentle than you would elsewhere on Making Light. Try to avoid “helpiness”/”hlepiness” (those comments which look helpful, but don’t take account of the addressee’s situation and agency). Apologize readily and sincerely if you tread on toes, even unintentionally. This kind of conversation only works because people have their defenses down.
  5. Never underestimate the value of a good witness. If you want to be supportive but don’t have anything specific to say, people do value knowing that they are heard.

Previous posts (note that comments are closed on them to keep the conversation in one place):

August 17, 2016
It’s a book
Posted by Patrick at 08:20 PM * 22 comments

Available at the NESFA Press table at MidAmeriCon; also at a reading and signing by the author tomorrow, Thursday, 18 August, 2 PM in 2203 in the convention center.

IMG_8894-c.jpg

To reiterate, yes, it’ll be available online from NESFA Press (and via other online ordering options) after MidAmeriCon. And yes, an e-book will be available by and by.

August 03, 2016
A spoiler thread for Star Trek Beyond
Posted by Teresa at 08:02 PM * 42 comments

Is Star Trek Beyond a movie with a good feel for the original show, or a super-sized ST:TOS episode? Is Zachary Quinto’s Spock a grown-up Wonder Twin? And are Jaylah’s facial markings evidence that Star Wars fandom persists in the Star Trek universe?

All this and more.

Our Worldcon schedule
Posted by Patrick at 07:06 AM * 28 comments

MidAmeriCon II, the 74th World Science Fiction Convention, Kansas City, Missouri, August 17-21. Appearances subject to change, check your pocket programs and newsletter updates, contents may settle in shipping, you know the drill. Thanks to the concom and especially Ian Stockdale for their help and patience in arranging all this.

The explanatory notes appended to some items in this list are my own, not MidAmeriCon’s.

Wednesday 1 PM, KCCC 2209
I Remember Big MAC
Joe Haldeman, Mike Resnick, Janice Bogstad (m), PNH
“Big MAC” was the slang term for the first MidAmericon, 40 years ago in 1976. Based on the Worldcon’s growth from 1972 to 1974, it was expected to be unprecedentedly huge. In fact it wasn’t. But it was a lot of people’s first Worldcon—mine, and Tom Doherty’s, to name just two. And in innumerable ways it set important patterns and precedents for decades of Worldcons to come.

Wednesday 2 PM, KCCC 2207
Does SF Still Affect How We Think About the Future?
Michael Swanwick, Cynthia Ward, Adam-Troy Castro, PNH

Wednesday 5 PM, KCCC “Heinlein Stadium”
Opening Ceremony: Meet the Guests of Honor
Ruth Lichtwardt (chair), Pat Cadigan (toastmaster), Michael Swanwick, Tamora Pierce, Kinuko Y. Craft, PNH & TNH

Wednesday 6 PM, KCCC “Olympus Mons”
Fandom Rocks! Introduction and Docent Tour
Geri Sullivan, TNH
Teresa, Geri, and a lot of extremely interesting rocks, large and small. Geology nerds rule.

Wednesday 7 PM, KCCC 2204
The Interstices of Historical Fiction and Fan Fiction
Lyda Morehouse (m), Heather Urbanski, Sumana Harihareswara, TNH

Thursday 11 AM, KCCC 2209
The Future of Work
Eric James Stone, Renée Sieber (m), TNH

Thursday noon, KCCC 3501H
Is Cyberpunk Still a Thing?
Pat Cadigan, Matt Jacobson, Alvaro Zinos-Amaro, James Patrick Kelly, Cory Doctorow (m), PNH

Thursday noon, KCCC 2206
What Is a Fan Writer?
Rich Lynch, Guy Lillian, Foz Meadows, Goldeen Ogawa, Lyda Morehouse (m), TNH

Thursday 1 PM, KCCC 2209
As You Know, Bob…: The Fine Art of Exposition
Stanley Schmidt, Eric James Stone, Tamora Pierce, Kevin J. Anderson, Matthew S. Rotundo (m), TNH
One of Teresa’s signature subjects.

Thursday 1 PM, KCCC 3501B
An Introduction to Conventions for Professionals
Gay Haldeman, Janice Gelb, Bill Sutton, Matt Wallace, PNH
Professionals new to old-line SF fandom? Here’s what you need to know. Starting with, It’s Not About You.

Thursday 2 PM, KCCC 2203
Making Conversation: Reading and Autographing
TNH
Teresa reads from the new collection, then signs. Copies will be on hand for sale.

Thursday 3 PM, KCCC 2206
The Past, It Ain’t What it Used to Be
Elizabeth Bear, David Gerrold, Ctein (m), TNH

Thursday 3 PM, KCCC 2503B
All Our Yesterdays: How the Worldcon has Covered Fandom’s History Over the Years
Joe Siclari (m), Clare McDonald-Sims, Rich Lynch, PNH

Thursday 4 PM, KCCC 2503A
What’s New from Tor
Tom Doherty, Beth Meacham, Liz Gorinsky, Miriam Weinberg, Jen Gunnels, Irene Gallo, Patty Garcia, PNH
In which we announce that everyone at the Worldcon and the entire populations of Yorkshire, Barcelona, and Gary, Indiana have now been hired as editors at Tor Books. You will find your intake forms beneath your seats. Prepare to ascend.

Friday 11 AM, KCCC Art Show
Art Docent Tour (advance signup required)
Ctein, TNH
Teresa and Ctein give their opinionated tour of the art show, as they have every year since mumble-mumble.

Friday noon, KCCC 2208
The Future Is a Different Country
Andrea Philips, Edward Lerner, Kathleen M. Goonan (m), PNH

Friday 1 PM, KCCC 2210
Making Print: How Technological Changes Affect What We Read
Beth Meacham, John D. Berry, Jim Murray, TNH
I actually wrote the official precis for this item: “The history of publishing is a history of changing technologies. Web presses made the pulp magazines and cheap paperbacks possible. Cheap offset printing created a forest of tiny magazines. We all know, or think we know, about the first-order effects of DTP and the Web. And then there’s the intersection of technological change and distribution methods. What’s the history we don’t fully understand? And what’s next?”

Friday 1 PM, KCCC 2208
An Idiot’s Guide Revisited
Karl Schroeder, Cory Doctorow, PNH
In the long-ago futuristic year of 2000 AD, Alpha Books’ “Complete Idiot’s Guide” series published Cory Doctorow and Karl Schroeder’s The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Publishing Science Fiction, complete with cover quote and preface by me. Now, in the post-singularity world of 2016, we scrabble down from our hanging egg sacs to re-examine this period piece.

Friday 2 PM, KCCC 2209
Feminism in Science Fiction: When It Changed
Jeanne Gomoll, Eileen Gunn (m), PNH
Katy drives like a maniac.

Friday 3 PM, KCCC 3501D
Moderation and Community Management
John Scalzi and Teresa Nielsen Hayden
A dialogue.

Friday 5 PM, KCCC 3501H
Patrick and Teresa Nielsen Hayden: Fractal, Interstitial, Fannish
Tom Whitmore (m), PNH & TNH
Tom Whitmore interviews us, without a net.

Friday 6 PM, KCCC 3501H
Hamilton as Alternative History and Fan Fiction
Rachael Acks, John Chu, Sunil Patel, Mark Oshiro (m), PNH
Work, work!

Saturday 1 PM, KCCC 2210
Editors: Not Just a Single Job
Anne Sowards, Jim Minz, Liz Gorinsky (m), PNH & TNH

Saturday 3 PM, KCCC 3501D
The Secret History of Science Fiction
Michael Swanwick, Gordon Van Gelder, Eileen Gunn, TNH
All the gossip, some of it true.

Saturday 4 PM, KCCC 3501F
In Memoriam: David G. Hartwell
Kathryn Cramer, Tom Doherty, Michael Swanwick, PNH

Sunday 1 PM, KCCC 2209
Transcending the Genre
Tom Easton, Rich Horton, Jennie Goloboy (m), TNH

Sunday 2 PM, KCCC 2211
Kaffeeklatsch (advance signup required)
PNH & TNH

Sunday 4 PM, KCCC “Tucker Stage”
Closing Ceremony
Ruth Lichtwardt (chair), Pat Cadigan (toastmaster), Michael Swanwick, Tamora Pierce, Kinuko Y. Craft, PNH & TNH

August 02, 2016
Whisperado, this Thursday
Posted by Patrick at 11:03 AM * 2 comments

In our first Manhattan gig in a very long time, Whisperado will play Arlene’s Grocery at 95 Stanton Street (one block south of Houston, one block east of Allen) this coming Thursday, August 4, at 8 PM. In the words of fearless leader Jon Sobel, “New songs, new energy, and of course a shot of the same old crankiness.”

July 31, 2016
Open thread 213
Posted by Patrick at 01:13 PM * 1020 comments

Because the previous one is at well over a thousand comments. Oops!

Also, Worldcon members, today is your last day to vote in this year’s Hugo Awards.